Transport

Strategic Context

Transport (excluding aviation and international shipping) contributes almost a quarter of the UK’s carbon emissions (approximately 120 million tonnes of CO2 a year), of which around 8% comes from heavy duty vehicles and 16.5% comes from light duty vehicles. Transport therefore has a huge role to play in reducing UK greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050.

Programme Aim

The Transport programme is split into two Focus Areas:

Plug-in Vehicles Economics and Infrastructure Focus Area

  • Evaluate the potential role and economics of plug-in vehicles in the low carbon transport system
  • Develop the technology tool-kit for delivering an intelligent infrastructure to support plug-in vehicles

Heavy Duty Vehicle Efficiency Focus Area

  • Identify and demonstrate a package of powertrain efficiency improvement technologies relevant to multiple domains within the heavy duty (liquid fuel) transport sector.

Project summaries

Please click the following projects below for detail:

Catalytic Conversion Efficiencies in HDV exhaust systems

Project summary lead image Catalytic Conversion Efficiencies in HDV exhaust systems

ETI Investment

£4.5 million

Date announced

January 2013

Project Partners

  • Johnson Matthey
  • Loughborough University
  • Caterpillar

Overview

This project seeks to improve the catalytic conversion efficiencies of exhaust systems in Heavy Duty Vehicles (HDV).

Its aim is to help HDV fuel efficiency by developing a more efficient exhaust emission clean up system - commonly known as catalytic convertors. The new exhaust system that will be developed by this project will seek to remove the constraints of exhaust emission standards to make a HDV diesel engine more fuel efficient.

The efficiencies created need to be based on an economically viable solution. This project aims to deliver fuel efficiency and CO2 benefits of between 3-4%.

As part of this project, Loughborough University's research team will develop optical test facilities for the analysis of HDV exhaust after-treatment systems. This development will lead to world-leading exhaust emission standards reduction technology.

Lower Drivetrain HDV Efficiency Project

Project summary lead image Lower Drivetrain HDV Efficiency Project

ETI Investment

£2.5m

Date announced

July 2012

Completion date

Winter 2015

Project Partners

  • Romax Technology
  • Castrol Ltd
  • ANSYS Inc

Overview

This project will improve the efficiency of Heavy Duty Vehicles by cutting the amount of parasitic losses in the Lower Drivetrain system by 50%. Parasitic losses - that are caused by the churning of the lubricating oil and component friction - in HDVs and off-road vehicle energy losses. This project will look to improve the overall system design, with a synergistic focus on gears, bearings, surface treatments, lubricant flow and lubricant composition.

The ETI commissioned and funded project is led by Nottingham based Romax Technology, who will work in collaboration with Castrol Ltd and ANSYS Inc. Romax will be responsible for the Lower Drivetrain design and analysis, Castrol Ltd will work on oil development and ANSYS will model the lubrication system with its engineering simulation technology.

Technologies advanced and developed through this project will then be available to be utilised across a portfolio of HDVs including HGVs, coaches, buses, tractors, back-hoe loaders, wheeled loaders and articulated quarry trucks.

Heavy Duty Vehicle Efficiency Platform Technologies Systems Integration - Land

Project summary lead image Heavy Duty Vehicle Efficiency Platform Technologies Systems Integration - Land

ETI Investment

£3m

Date announced

March 2012

Completion date

November 2013

Project Partners

  • Caterpillar

Overview

This is the first project to be commissioned in the £40m Heavy Duty Vehicle (HDV) Efficiency Programme.


The HDV fleet, which comprises of heavy goods vehicles, medium goods vehicles, buses, coaches, construction machinery, quarry machines, mining machines, agricultural equipment and marine vessels, has been split into two main areas –
land vehicles and marine vessels.


This project will focus on the concept engineering of a range of innovative and efficient land vehicles.
The output of this project will help to determine which technologies are required to achieve a 30% fuel consumption reduction in the land based HDV fleet. This project builds upon the HDV Efficiency Focus Area feasibility study completed in 2010.


During Phase 2 of the Programme, the ETI will invest in the under developed technology areas prior to a full-scale demonstration of all of the technologies and systems in Phase 3.


The demonstration vehicle will be a Caterpillar AT725 articulated off-highway truck.

Heavy Duty Vehicle - Efficiency

Project summary lead image Heavy Duty Vehicle - Efficiency

ETI Investment

£0.3m

Date announced

October 2009

Completion date

June 2010

Project Partners

  • Ricardo
  • Caterpillar
  • Rolls-Royce

Overview

The UK heavy duty fleet (HDV), which includes HGVs, buses and coaches, ships and trains, currently consumes more than 13.5 billion litres of liquid fuel each year.

This project identified the technology packages and assessed the carbon benefits case for them. The study analysed the UK’s HDV fleet and identified ways in which technological solutions could increase efficiencies and contribute to a reduction in liquid fuel consumption.

The ability to combine individual technology developments into packages which can be implemented across a range of vehicles will be critical in enabling rapid, cost-effective reductions in CO2 emissions. We are now using these outputs to define and commission a large-scale technology development and demonstration programme.

Light Duty Vehicle - Consumers and Vehicles

Project summary lead image Light Duty Vehicle - Consumers and Vehicles

ETI Investment

£4.5m between three transport electrification projects

Date announced

March 2010

Completion date

Summer 2011

Project Partners

  • Ricardo
  • Element Energy
  • TRL
  • Shell
  • University of Aberdeen
  • University of Sussex

Overview

Project announced March 2010 and completed in Summer 2011. Part of £11m initiative announced in September 2009.

This in-depth project has been looking at the potential long-term performance and cost of plug-in vehicles, as well as consumer reactions and behaviours in buying and using them. It has explored supporting infrastructure, and has included in-depth surveys with 3,000 consumers and real-world testing with 40 drivers.

The project was the first of three projects in the Plug-in Vehicle Economics and infrastructure focus area.

Light Duty Vehicle - Electricity Distribution & Intelligent Infrastructure

Project summary lead image Light Duty Vehicle - Electricity Distribution 
& Intelligent Infrastructure

ETI Investment

£4.5 million between three ongoing transport electrification projects

Date announced

March 2010

Completion date

Summer 2011

Project Partners

  • IBM
  • EDF Energy
  • E-ON
  • Imperial College London

Overview

Project announced March 2010 and completed in Summer 2011. Part of £11m initiative announced in September 2009.

This detailed project has been looking at the potential impact of electric vehicles on the UK electricity distribution grid, as well as assessing the recharging infrastructure required to support mass market adoption of plug-in vehicles in the UK.

Working with a wide-range of stakeholders, it has also defined the system architecture to integrate vehicles, electricity networks, charging points and payment systems.

 

Light Duty Vehicle - Economics & Carbon Benefits

Project summary lead image Light Duty Vehicle - Economics &
Carbon Benefits

ETI Investment

£4.5m between three ongoing transport electrification projects

Date announced

March 2010

Completion date

Summer 2011

Project Partners

  • ARUP
  • E-ON
  • University of Leeds

Overview

March 2010 and completed in Summer 2011. Part of £11m initiative announced in September 2009.

This project provided a strategic level analysis of the potential size of the market for plug-in vehicles, the total level of investment needed and the total carbon offset.

This analysis was conducted against a set of scenarios including technology breakthrough, macro-economics and government policy. It will determine the viability of different pathways to a self-sustaining mass market for plug-in vehicles.

The project was the third of three current projects in the Plug-in Vehicle Economics and Infrastructure focus area.

We have been working with infrastructure providers, government, industry leaders, information management companies, vehicle manufacturers and leading cities in the UK.

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